Vintage Trains

Vintage Train Sundays!

Step back in time

On successive Sundays in 2022, Vintage Trains will operate using a selection of our collection of historic older coaches, many of which date back to Victorian times and rarely see public use. These carriages form part of the Railway’s museum collection and include examples from the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Trust (L&YRT) and the Vintage Carriages Trust (VCT) which have been restored to pristine condition, and in the case of the L&YRT coaches, two from use as bungalows when their railway life came to an end.

On Vintage Train Sundays, a Brass Band will be performing across the day. If the weather is fine, the band will be performing out at Oxenhope Station, if the weather is questionable they will perform undercover at Keighley Station. Please find below the Brass Band Roster!

Dates

Sunday 19th June
Sunday 26th June
Sunday 3rd July
Sunday 10th July
Sunday 17th July


LOCOMOTIVES

85 Taff Vale Railway Class 02

Having originally been built for the Taff Vale Railway, 85 was sold by the Great Western Railway into colliery service in the North East before entering preservation by the KWVR in 1970.

Built for service in the Welsh Valleys north of Cardiff, no. 85 was deemed surplus to requirements at the time of the grouping in 1923 and was withdrawn by the Great Western Railway in 1927. In 1929, now numbered 426, it made the long journey north to the Durham coalfields where it remained in service, as NCB no. 52, until 1968.

Salvation came in 1970 when 85 was bought by the KWVR and brought to Haworth for a new life on passenger services.

Built: 1899 Glasgow

52044 Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Class 25 ‘Ironclad’

As 52044 this engine became subject to one of the earliest private locomotive purchase schemes established in the country and was one of the earliest arrivals on the nascent KWVR.

Affectionately known as ‘The Green Dragon’ in ‘The Railway Children’ film, 957 is being restored to working order at Haworth with the target of it being ready to take its place in the 50th-anniversary celebrations of The Railway Children in 2020.

Built: 1887 Beyer Peacock

1054 London & North Western Railway 0-6-2T ‘Coal Tank’

Without the outbreak of war 1054 (then LMS no. 7799) would have been visiting the breakers as it was withdrawn from service on the day before the war was declared. With a need for motive power, 7799 was restored to service and lasted for another 19 years.

When eventually withdrawn, the locomotive was bought privately before passing to the National Trust and eventually handed to the Bahamas Locomotive Society for safekeeping

Built-in 1888, reprieved from the scrap man by WW2 in 1939, 1054 eventually served the national network for 70 years before passing into preservation after being sent for scrap for the second time.

Privately preserved initially, 1054 was given to the National Trust and, in time, was passed into the stewardship of the Bahamas Locomotive Society at Dinting, testimony to the care bestowed on their own locomotive, 45596 ‘Bahamas’.

Rolling Stock

L&YR no. 47, this Blackpool Club Car was built in 1912 for the exclusive use of businessmen commuting between Blackpool and Manchester. It ended its working life in 1951, being sold for use as a cricket pavilion and then brought to the Railway by the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Trust in 1993 where a full restoration was completed in 2011. No. 47 is an excellent example of an executive saloon, complete with real leather seating and a handcrafted interior.

Built probably in 1880 at the L&Y Newton Heath works, after nearly 30 years of service the underframe was removed and body relocated to Valley Gardens, Hapton near Burnley, where initially from around 1910 it provided accommodation for newly-employed miners.

There were over 10 similar carriage bodies in the area, most of which were later built into bungalows as normal family homes.  By the 1980s many had been removed (typically burned) and replaced by bungalows of conventional construction.  279 was the last to survive on the site and was kindly donated in 1996 via the family of the late Bob Christie, who had lived there for many years.


LYR 1474 Hughes taper-end Brake Third built 1910 at Newton Heath works, bogie brake third with 5 passenger compartments as well as a Guard and luggage compartment.


Built probably in 1882 at the L&Y Newton Heath works, after nearly 30 years of service the underframe was removed and the body relocated to Valley Gardens, Hapton near Burnley, where initially from around 1910 it provided accommodation for newly-employed miners.

Originally built for Stockton & Darlington Railway in 1871, the coach didn’t become an inspection saloon until 1876 when taken in by North Eastern Railway and converted. The coach was withdrawn after nearly 100 years of service in 1969 and was purchased for preservation by KWVR Society member, John Dawson. The coach became famous as the “Old Gentleman’s Coach” in the Railway Children Film.

BRASS BANDS

Linthwaite Brass Band or Linfit Band as it is affectionately known, if you are local, is located in the heart of the Colne Valley near Huddersfield, West Yorkshire.

Our band is steeped in history and currently, we are in a comfortable position in the 4th Section of the British Brass Band Association league tables, and we are a coiled spring ready to bounce into the league above. Along the way, if we can maintain our policy of promoting the talents of young (and older) players, then success will come to all as shown in our history of contest achievements and the numerous players who have moved on to top-flight bands or become professional musicians. If we could just entice them back to support the band again….

Linfit Band has always been a self-supporting village band without any funding from sponsorship or the constraints of “club” facilities and prides itself on being able to make its way each year, although there are times when it would be nice to have the extra pairs of hands that these aspects can bring! If you can lend a hand, have no fear, bite the bullet and get in contact!

The Haworth Band is a long-established and celebrated brass band situated in the picturesque Pennine village of Haworth in West Yorkshire – home to the literary ‘Bronte’ family and the Railway Children.

The Haworth Band strives to serve the local community and to provide a forum for musicians of any age who enjoy playing music in an ensemble. We endeavour to encourage the development of new players and provide instruments and musical tuition.

Band members agree that it would be hard to live in or around Lofthouse and not know someone who is involved in some way with the Lofthouse 2000 Brass Band.

It was set up in 1999 with just a handful of musicians and a few instruments. Since then it has grown into a flourishing organisation, helped by the brass tradition of supplying instruments and tuition to players for a modest subscription. There are three bands: Beginner Brass, for those starting from scratch, Brass Roots, for those who are developing their skills, and then the main band, who have recently won the 2022 3rd Section Yorkshire Regional Championships.

The band is thoroughly involved in activities at all levels in and around Lofthouse and the neighbouring communities. From concerts, fetes, garden parties, bandstands, event openings, church services and Christmas carolling, the band is never still and enjoys being an active part of local communities.

The Haworth Band is a long-established and celebrated brass band situated in the picturesque Pennine village of Haworth in West Yorkshire – home to the literary ‘Bronte’ family and the Railway Children.

The Haworth Band strives to serve the local community and to provide a forum for musicians of any age who enjoy playing music in an ensemble. We endeavour to encourage the development of new players and provide instruments and musical tuition.

Linthwaite Brass Band or Linfit Band as it is affectionately known, if you are local, is located in the heart of the Colne Valley near Huddersfield, West Yorkshire.

Our band is steeped in history and currently, we are in a comfortable position in the 4th Section of the British Brass Band Association league tables, and we are a coiled spring ready to bounce into the league above. Along the way, if we can maintain our policy of promoting the talents of young (and older) players, then success will come to all as shown in our history of contest achievements and the numerous players who have moved on to top-flight bands or become professional musicians. If we could just entice them back to support the band again….

Linfit Band has always been a self-supporting village band without any funding from sponsorship or the constraints of “club” facilities and prides itself on being able to make its way each year, although there are times when it would be nice to have the extra pairs of hands that these aspects can bring! If you can lend a hand, have no fear, bite the bullet and get in contact!

EVENT INFORMATION

Day rover fares: (Book your tickets online 3 days in advance & save 15%!)

  • Adult – £20
  • Concession – £17
  • Child – £10
  • Child under 5 – Free
  • Family (One adult or concession plus ONE child) – £25
  • Family (Two adults or concessions plus three children) – £50
  • Book 3 days in advance and save 15%!

If you live in Postcode areas BD20, BD21 or BD22,  you can take advantage of special reduced fares by being in possession of a Local Residents Railcard. Find out more information about how to apply on the website.

Car parks are available at five of the KWVR stations and for the benefit of satellite navigation system users, the KWVR station addresses & postcodes are:

  • KEIGHLEY – Keighley Railway Station, Station Bridge, Keighley, BD21 4HP
  • INGROW – Ingrow Railway Station, South Street, Ingrow, Keighley, BD21 5AX
  • OAKWORTH – Oakworth Railway Station, Station Road, Oakworth, Keighley, BD22 0DZ
  • HAWORTH – The Railway Station, Station Road, Haworth, Keighley, BD22 8NJ
  • OXENHOPE – Oxenhope Railway Station, Station Road, Oxenhope, Keighley, BD22 9LB

You can find out more information about getting the railway, in the dedicated travel section.

The very nature of the vintage carriages fleet is that the coaches come from an age where access for disabled passengers was not a priority and therefore, as the vehicles are restored to their original condition, those wishing to travel onboard our vintage train and have a disability may have difficulty boarding the train.

In addition, those disabled passengers with wheelchairs or motorised ‘buggies’ should be aware that the nature of the coaches means there is nowhere to store either wheelchairs or ‘buggies’ on the train, except in the guard’s van. Please speak to a member of station staff who may be able to assist.

The vintage coaches that make up the Vintage Train were built-in an age when children’s pushchairs and buggies were a thing of the future and, as the vehicles that make up the train are restored to their original condition, there is no provision, except in the guard’s van, on the train to store them whilst you enjoy your journey back in time. Please speak to a member of station staff who may be able to assist.